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Thanksgiving Proclamation

In our observance of Thanksgiving, we’re publishing President John F. Kennedy’s proclamation from November 1963.

Over three centuries ago, our forefathers in Virginia and in Massachusetts, far from home in a lonely wilderness, set aside a time of thanksgiving. On the appointed day, they gave reverent thanks for their safety, for the health of their children, for the fertility of their fields, for the love which bound them together and for the faith which united them with their God.

So too when the colonies achieved their independence, our first President in the first year of his first Administration proclaimed November 26, 1789, as “a day of public thanksgiving and prayer to be observed by acknowledging with grateful hearts the many signal favors of Almighty god” and called upon the people of the new republic to “beseech Him to pardon our national and other transgressions… to promote the knowledge and practice of true religion and virtue… and generally to grant unto all mankind such a degree of temporal prosperity as He alone knows to be best.”

And so too, in the midst of America’s tragic civil war, President Lincoln proclaimed the last Thursday of November 1863 as a day to renew our gratitude for America’s “fruitful fields,” for our “national strength and vigor,” and for all our “singular deliverances and blessings.”

Much time has passed since the first colonists came to rocky shores and dark forests of an unknown continent, much time since President Washington led a young people into the experience of nationhood, much time since President Lincoln saw the American nation through the ordeal of fraternal war – and in these years our population, our plenty and our power have all grown apace. Today we are a nation of nearly two hundred million souls, stretching from coast to coast, on into the Pacific and north toward the Arctic, a nation enjoying the fruits of an ever-expanding agriculture and industry and achieving standards of living unknown in previous history. We give our humble thanks for this.

Yet, as our power has grown, so has our peril. Today we give our thanks, most of all, for the ideals of honor and faith we inherit from our forefathers – for the decency of purpose, steadfastness of resolve and strength of will, for the courage and the humility, which they possessed and which we must seek every day to emulate. As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words but to live by them.

Let us therefore proclaim our gratitude to Providence for manifold blessings – let us be humbly thankful for inherited ideals – and let us resolve to share those blessings and those ideals with our fellow human beings throughout the world.

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Action

What’s Next

What an election! 

At the national level, a wave of political organizing delivered the win we desperately needed – Joe Biden and Kamala Harris in the White House. While down ballot races went other directions, a Biden – Harris win proves that we can do the hard things. 

Two years from now, all of our local elected officials are on the ballot along with our state house representatives and governor. Our work for electing Democrats to those offices starts right now.

Here’s what we need and where you can help:

1) Each of the eight districts in our county will have a designated District Captain. This person lead organizing efforts in the district. From phone calls to postcards and everything in between, our District Captains will make sure they know every Democrat in the district and work to expand our base there.

If you want to be a District Captain, click here to sign up and volunteer.

2) With all of the offices up in 2022, we need to start setting up campaigns now. The biggest lesson learned from our 2020 candidates is that it takes two years to really run an effective campaign. Rural communities are simply to big for shorter time frames.

If you want to run for office, click here to sign up and volunteer.

3) Along with candidates and  district captains, we’re looking for folks that might be interested in managing different parts of local and state campaigns.

If you want to manage a campaign, click here to sign up and volunteer.

All three of these will be core to our organizing and winning in the next election. If you want to make a difference, this is where to start.As we get these candidates and district captains going, new needs will appear. So stay tuned for those as well.

The Biden-Harris campaign proves we can do the hard things. Organizing Lincoln County and Tennessee won’t be easy. We’ll have to fight for every inch of ground that we gain. We’ll have to have the hard conversations to persuade former-Republican voters to come our way. But to do anything less is not an option.

This is more than a moment. It’s the start of a movement. One that we intend to win. 

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News

Biden-Harris Wins!

Statement from the LCPD Chair – Chase Clemons

Congratulations to President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris!

It’s been a long election and even longer campaign for all of our Democratic candidates and their teams. This election proves that when we unite and organize, we can do the hard things.

For everyone that worked campaigns – national, state, and local – thank you. Make sure to take time now to recharge after this grueling election. There’s still work to be done. Our community need you at your best for the work ahead.

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Election

Your November Election Guide

Here’s everything you’ll need to know about the November 3rd election.

Your Democratic Candidates
Here’s the Democrats who you’ll see on your ballot on November 3rd.

How to Register to Vote
To vote in November, you must be registered by October 5th.

You’ve got three options for registering:

  • Online – Head over to the GoVoteTN.com site here to register.
  • By Mail – Print the voter registration form here and send it in by mail.
  • In-Person – Stop by 208 Davidson Street East Room 106 here in Fayetteville. The Election Commission is open Monday thru Friday from 8:00am to 4:00pm. You can fill out the registration form there.

Check Your Voter Registration
Head over to GoVoteTN.com to find info on your polling place as well as check your registration. You can also stop by the Election Commission at 208 Davidson Street East – Room 106.

Even if you voted recently, double check your voter registration to make sure you’re still on the voting list.

How to Vote Early
Early voting runs from Wednesday October 14th to Thursday October 29th. Voting hours are 8am to 4pm on weekdays. On Saturdays, voting hours are 8am to 12pm Noon.

You’ll vote at the Election Commission – 208 Davidson Street East – Room 106 / Fayetteville, Tennessee 37334

How to Vote
Head over to GoVoteTN.com to find info on your polling place.

Polls are open from 9am to 7pm on election day – November 3rd. If you’re in line at 7pm, stay in line and vote.

Make sure to bring a valid photo ID. Any of the following IDs may be used, even if expired:

  • Tennessee driver license with your photo
  • United States Passport
  • Photo ID issued by the Tennessee Department of Safety and Homeland Security
  • Photo ID issued by the federal or Tennessee state government
  • United States Military photo ID
  • Tennessee handgun carry permit with your photoCollege student IDs and photo IDs not issued by the federal or Tennessee state government are NOT acceptable. This includes county or city issued photo IDs, such as library cards, and photo IDs issued by other states.

Need help getting a valid ID? We can help you get one.

Need a ride to the polls? We can help with that too.

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News

Labor Day

Remarks from our Chair on this Labor Day.

Thank you to all of the working men and women who fought and organized to secure so much of what we have today. The 40 hour work week, family leave, the minimum wage, overtime pay, and the right to organize for better benefits – we have these because time after time, American workers showed up and fought for them.

This pandemic has shown us just how vitally essential our workers are. From farmers to grocery store workers, nurses to teachers, we all owe a debt of gratitude to those in our community hard at work keeping our community going.

On this Labor Day, as we celebrate our working men and women, let’s recommit ourselves to the fight for every working family. Workers right are human rights. And we have to fight for those rights every day. 

It starts with voting this fall. Organize with your friends, families, and neighbors. Show up for your community. Put in the work now to help build a better Tennessee that works for us all.

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News

Absentee Voting

With all the confusing information around absentee ballots, we want to set the record straight. 

Tennessee voters cannot drop absentee ballots off to county election commissions. Absentee ballots must be mailed only through USPS, Fedex, or UPS.

If you know you’re going to vote absentee by mail, request your ballot ASAP. Once you receive it, fill it out and mail it back immediately.

How to Vote Absentee

  1. Review the absentee ballot application and confirm that you meet the eligibility requirements for voting absentee. You can find those here.
  2. Fill out the application completely.
  3. Submit the request to our local election office. You should request your ballot as far in advance of the election as possible. The deadline to request a ballot by mail is (received by) Tuesday, October 27, 2020.
  4. When your ballot arrives, read it carefully and follow the instructions to complete it and return it immediately.

If you have questions, let us know!

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News

The August Election

With the August 6th election just days away, we’re focused on just one action this week. Get People To The Polls Check in with all of the voters you know and make sure they’ve either voted early/absentee or have a plan to vote Thursday. For voters that are voting Thursday, a good practice is to check these three things with them: 

  1. When will you vote on August 6th? Set aside a specific time on Thursday to head over to your polling place.
  2. Where will you vote? If you don’t know your polling place, call our local Election Commission or go to GoVoteTN.com on your phone/computer.
  3. How will you get there? Make sure you’ve got a way to get to your polling place. If you need a ride, let us know!

 Statewide, Democratic turnout was only up 2% compared to the 2018 primary. Here in Lincoln County, Dems were up 17% but the GOP was up 21%. That means we’ve got to get a lot of people to the polls on Thursday. Take time now – go through your contact list – and check-in with every voter that you know. It’s the best way to make sure they’re voting in this August election. Let’s do this.

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News

Online Town Halls

Usually during this time of the year, candidates are visiting our community to introduce themselves and talk with us. This year, the pandemic has forced us to move those types of events online. 

Through these online town halls, you’ll get to know the candidates you’ll be voting for in the Democratic Primary on August 6th. 

Here’s all the ones we’ve hosted so far:













Click on any of the images above to view the town hall video. 

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Action

Vote Absentee by Mail

If you can’t vote on election day, you may qualify to cast your absentee ballot by mail!

Requirements

To vote absentee by mail, a registered voter must fall under one of the following categories:

  • The voter will be outside the county of registration during the early voting period and all day on election day;
  • The voter or the voter’s spouse is enrolled as a full-time student in an accredited college or university outside the county of registration;
  • The voter’s licensed physician has filed a statement with the county election commission stating that, in the physician’s judgment, the voter is medically unable to vote in person. The statement must be filed not less than seven (7) days before the election and signed under the penalty of perjury;
  • The voter resides in a licensed facility providing relatively permanent domiciliary care, other than a penal institution, outside the voter’s county of residence;
  • The voter will be unable to vote in person due to service as a juror for a federal or state court;
  • The voter is sixty (60) years of age or older;
  • The voter has a physical disability and an inaccessible polling place;
  • The voter is hospitalized, ill, or physically disabled and because of such condition, cannot vote in person;
  • The voter is a caretaker of a person who is hospitalized, ill, or disabled;
  • The voter is a candidate for office in the election;
  • The voter serves as an election day official or as a member or employee of the election commission;
  • The voter’s observance of a religious holiday prevents him or her from voting in person during the early voting period and on election day;
  • The voter or the voter’s spouse possesses a valid commercial drivers license (CDL) or the voter possesses a valid Transportation Worker Identification Credential (TWIC) card and certifies that he or she will be working outside the state or county of registration during the open hours of early voting and Election Day, and has no specific out-of-county or out-of-state address to which mail may be sent or received during such time.
  • The voter is a member of the military or is an overseas citizen.

If you qualify, you can apply for a by-mail ballot up to 90 days before the election.

Apply for a By-Mail Ballot

For the August Primary Election, you can send in your request form starting May 8th through July 30th.

To request a by-mail ballot:

  1. Print out and complete the Absentee Request Form here.
  2. Mail, fax, or email that form to our local election commission. You can find the contact info you’ll need here.
  3. Your election commission will process your request and mail you a ballot.
  4. Complete your ballot and mail it back to your election commission.

For the August election, to receive a primary ballot request either a Republican or Democratic primary ballot. If no indication, you will receive a general election only ballot.

Make sure to do all of this before July 30th. That’s the request deadline for the August 6th election.

If you need help with any of that, send us a message and we’ll help!

Categories
Action

Train the Trainer 2020

With the ongoing pandemic, campaigns all across Tennessee are shifting focus to digital strategies in place of the usual in-person organizing. To help out, our party has partnered with the Association of State Democratic Committees to launch our 2020 Train the Trainer (T3) Webinar Training Program!

T3 is a free, 100% virtual, six-week, twelve-part webinar course, covering several aspects of grassroots campaigning. This program seeks to expand the skills of progressive activists and volunteers, by ensuring that comprehensive training is free and accessible for Democrats all over the country. Register for T3 today, and help us take our country back in 2020!

–>> Click Here to Register

T3 trainings are held every Tuesday and Thursday from 7:00-8:00 p.m. ET, from April 7, through May 14. The deadline to register is Sunday, April 5 at 11:59 p.m. ET.

Participants must complete all twelve sessions in order to receive certification. All training sessions will include a skills test to track retention and participation. Trainings will be recorded and made available following each session via a weekly wrap-up email, delivered on Fridays.

Click Here to submit your registration for the 2020 T3 Training Program! Registration will close at 11:59 p.m. ET, on Sunday, April 5.

We’ll see you on the campaign trail!